Proposing A Continuum of Legal Education and Collaboration Beyond Three Years

By: Gregory Bordelon, Executive Director of the Louisiana Committee on Bar Admissions

Law school may be three years, but preparing for life as a lawyer takes much longer – an educational journey that spans close to twenty, if we’re speaking only about formal schooling.  The intricate web of life events that influences a person’s decision to become a lawyer cannot be easily distilled through the often intense period of adapting to the first year of law school. It is not a “one size fits all” proposition.  This, in part, is why people react differently to the 1L year, some with intellectual exhilaration, some with confusion, and others with anxiety and doubt. I refer to studying legal education before and after law school as continuum studies – the study of how events before and after law school impact lawyering. Continue reading “Proposing A Continuum of Legal Education and Collaboration Beyond Three Years”

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‘Twas the Night Before Finals

By: Abigail Perdue 

Final exams can be daunting for first-year law students. Many of them have never had their grade in a course rest on a single exam or been forced to recall everything they have learned throughout the semester under tight time constraints. Although exam anxiety is natural, it can undermine performance. Thus, to interject some light and levity into the stressful exam period, I send my students the following poetic parody of Clement C. Moore’s A Visit from St. Nicholas: Continue reading “‘Twas the Night Before Finals”

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Journaling Your Way to a Job

By: Dana Graber, Regulatory Counsel, Food Marketing Institute[1]

Attorneys are trained to document nearly everything we do.  In law school, every argument is backed by citation to corroborating case law. Likewise, in the real world, law firms spend thousands of dollars each year for document storage. But are law schools missing the mark when it comes to teaching attorneys-in-progress to consistently document their own skills and accomplishments?  I think the answer is yes, which may ultimately do students a disservice during post-graduate job searches. Continue reading “Journaling Your Way to a Job”

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Serve Up a Holiday-Themed Scavenger Hunt this Thanksgiving

By: Professor Kirsha Weyandt Trychta, West Virginia University College of Law

It’s often difficult to keep law students engaged around the holidays when they’re anxious to spend time with friends and family. Below are a few fun ways to promote student engagement by integrating the holidays into your classes.

If you find yourself over-stuffed this week, I do not recommend trying to sue “Thanksgiving, Pilgrims, Mayflower Movers, Pilgrim Pride, Turkey Hill, Black Friday, Corn on the Cob, [or the] Cleveland Indians.” Riches v. Thanksgiving, 2007 WL 4591385 (N.D. Cal 2007). A prisoner who was “offended” by the Thanksgiving holiday tried to do just that, but the court dismissed his claim finding that “[t]o the extent any of these defendants are actual entities that may be sued, they are private organizations that do not act under color of state law, an essential element of a § 1983 action.” And if you want a second helping of prisoner litigation, dish out Professor Abigail Perdue’s suggestion: Karmasu v. Hughes, 654 N.E.2d 179 (Ohio App. 1995) (concerning a prisoner who sued the prison dietician for serving turkey stuffing for Thanksgiving). Continue reading “Serve Up a Holiday-Themed Scavenger Hunt this Thanksgiving”

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Speed Editing

By: Abigail Perdue

“I feel the need . . . the need for speed.” – Top Gun

Apparently fictional fighter pilots and forward-thinking Jewish rabbis have that in common. The widespread modern phenomenon of speed dating purportedly began in the late nineties when an innovative Jewish rabbi organized the first speed dating event as an efficacious way for busy Jewish young professionals to meet and mingle (Kennedy 2013).

Speed dating soon became so popular that its model was exported to the business world. Speed mentoring events sprang up across the country, and after attending a particularly impactful one, I brainstormed how to implement “speed editing” in my writing classes. Speed editing simultaneously achieves multiple learning goals from encouraging collaboration to demonstrating how to work effectively under tight time constraints. It teaches students how to thoughtfully give and receive constructive feedback and further hones their editing and oral communication skills. Here’s how it works.

As our time on an assignment module draws to a close, I provide a brief overview of the effective editing techniques we have already discussed and then dedicate the remainder of our 1.5 hour session to speed editing. This generally occurs in one of two ways, each of which I will discuss below.
Continue reading “Speed Editing”

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