Getting to Know You: Using Pop Culture Pedagogy to Connect with Students

By: Professor Abigail L. Perdue, Wake Forest University School of Law

As a teacher I’ve been learning.
You’ll forgive me if I boast.
And I’ve now become an expert
On the subject I like most.
Getting to know you,
Getting to know all about you.
Getting to like you.
Getting to hope you like me.”

– Rodgers & Hammerstein, from Getting to Know You in The King and I

As a child, I was mildly obsessed with Rodgers and Hammerstein musicals. The King and I was my absolute favorite! I still remember the first time I saw the confident and commanding (albeit quite sexist) King of Siam twirling lithe Anna Leonowens all over the ballroom. The musical, which was inspired by true events, recounts the magical story of a British woman who travels halfway around the world to serve as governess to the King of Siam’s royal children.
Continue reading “Getting to Know You: Using Pop Culture Pedagogy to Connect with Students”

Share our content!

Reprogramming Your Writing Intuition


By: Professor Joe Regalia

When I ask judges what frustrates them most about lawyers, the conversation often turns to writing. I hear things like: “attorneys can’t write concisely,” and “why don’t law schools teach law students how to write?” Perhaps these problems persist because when you try to change how you write, you are butting up against years of subconscious habit—what I call your “writing intuition.” And just like making changes to other deep-seated habits in your life, changing your writing intuition takes significant work.
Continue reading “Reprogramming Your Writing Intuition”

Share our content!

How to Make a Great Second Impression in the Law School Classroom

By: Professor Joe Fore, University of Virginia School of Law, & Professor Emily Grant, Washburn University School of Law

First impressions matter. And it can be hard to overcome a bad one. So it should come as no surprise that the first day of any class is crucial in laying a foundation for a productive semester. The first day of class presents an opportunity to accomplish several important things:

  • Get to know the students and to let them get to know you. Let the students introduce themselves. And share your background with the class. It can help to establish credibility and let the students know where you’re coming from—both inside and outside of the classroom.
  • Establish a supportive and encouraging learning environment. Demonstrate your own enthusiasm for the course and for teaching and working with students. Encourage students to ask questions and to come to office hours.
  • Convey high—but achievable—standards. Let the students know that (a) you have high expectations, (b) they are capable of meeting them, and (c) you are ready, willing, and able to help. Studies have shown that such messages can improve student performance, particularly for minority students.

Continue reading “How to Make a Great Second Impression in the Law School Classroom”

Share our content!

Challenging Law Students to Become Active Learners

By: Professor Rosa Kim, Suffolk Law School

“While we teach, we learn.” – Roman philosopher Seneca

As a quiet but thoughtful student in high school, I was especially invested in my senior English class with Mr. B. He had the ability to make 19th century literature riveting and relevant. He was excellent with words and used them to captivate us and to make us care about each literary work and author. This was his gift, or so I thought.
Continue reading “Challenging Law Students to Become Active Learners”

Share our content!

A Tribute to Mrs. Mary Lycans Asbury and Her Legacy of Love

By: Professor Abigail L. Perdue, Wake Forest University School of Law

“If I speak in the tongues of men or of angels, but do not have love, I am only a resounding gong or a clanging cymbal.” – 1 Cor. 13:1

Mary Lycans Asbury was a force to be reckoned with. A petite woman slight of frame with dark, curly hair, she was the perfect blend of soft and hard, kind but exacting. On my first day of second grade, she entered our classroom adorned in a stunning, A-line white dress bedecked with bright pink roses. (Even more impressive, I would later learn she had sewn it herself.)
Continue reading “A Tribute to Mrs. Mary Lycans Asbury and Her Legacy of Love”

Share our content!