Judging the Benefits of Experiential Learning

By: Samuel Gilleran, J.D. ’20

This summer, I had the fantastic opportunity to participate in Wake Forest’s D.C. Summer Judicial Externship Program (the “Program”). Founded and directed by Professor Abigail Perdue, the Program places select 1Ls and 2Ls into unpaid externships with judges, special masters, and other federal adjudicators in Washington. The Program, which includes an evening course on judicial clerking, is a wonderful experience for many reasons, but I want to focus on one in particular: the significant difference between the externship experience and the traditional 1L curriculum. Continue reading “Judging the Benefits of Experiential Learning”

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Maintaining Humble Confidence in Law School

By: Brandon LaRose (WFU Law ’20) with contributions by Professor Abigail Perdue

If I could give one piece of advice to the person I was on the first day of law school, it would be to remain humble and be confident. One’s mental state plays a heavy role in ensuring a positive law school experience. Confidence anchors this idea of mental wellness, the importance of which is emphasized from day one. There is a fine line, however, between confidence and cockiness. Continue reading “Maintaining Humble Confidence in Law School”

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A Letter to my 1L Self

By: Thayse M. Almeida Wall (WFU Law ’20) with contributions by Professor Abigail Perdue

If I could give one piece of advice to the person I was on the first day of law school, it would be to keep in mind how lucky you are. For me, the law school application process started with the infamous LSAT. You might think this test is no big deal, but as a native Brazilian, I only started learning English during college. So I could barely understand the questions when I first read an LSAT exam let alone answer them correctly. But after a year of studying reading comprehension, logical reasoning, logic games, and taking too many practice exams to count, I finally got a score that would allow me to apply for a “well-ranked” law school. Continue reading “A Letter to my 1L Self”

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A Letter to my 1L Self

By: Kylie Hamilton (WFU Law ’20)

If I could give one piece of advice to the person I was on the first day of law school, it would be to ask more questions. Ask more questions to my classmates, both in my class and the classes above me; to my professors, and not just the ones on my schedule; and to the staff who help make Wake Law what it is—a real community. Continue reading “A Letter to my 1L Self”

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Finding Purpose in Every Day: Part Three of a Student-Authored Series

By: Cassidy Webb (WFU Law ’20)

1L Cassidy Webb

When I decided to attend law school, I never expected to find purpose in every single day. I knew with confidence that there was great purpose in my long-term goal: to provide valuable legal services to those who otherwise could not have access to it. But I never anticipated loving (or at least tolerating) reading the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, feeling such pride when editing my brief for the twentieth time, or forming close relationships with classmates from incredibly different backgrounds than my own. Yet every time I learned a different duty of care in Torts or finally “perfected” my Contracts outline, I was reminded how much I love this experience. Even during the most mundane parts of law school, I have constantly been encouraged to persevere.

Three main aspects of my 1L experience have cultivated my continual feeling of purpose: the passion of my classmates, the inspiration of guest speakers, and my repeated exposure to pro bono service. Continue reading “Finding Purpose in Every Day: Part Three of a Student-Authored Series”

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