New Year, New Attitude: Teaching Students to Practice Gratitude

By: Jennifer Richwine with an introduction and contributions by Professor Abigail Perdue

The new year is the perfect time to consider fresh ways to foster the formation of a healthy professional identity in law students. So I invited my esteemed colleague and friend, Jennifer Richwine, author of With Gratitude: The Power of a Thank You Note, to share her insights regarding the importance of teaching law students to practice gratitude. As a result of my insightful conversations with Jennifer through the years about the importance of saying thank you in the professional world, I devoted a section of my book, The All-Inclusive Guide to Judicial Clerking, to the importance of expressing gratitude to recommenders, mentors, and judges when applying for clerkships. I also included a sample thank you note. Now Jennifer has generously agreed to share her observations with TeachLawBetter.com, and in keeping with her topic, we are so grateful. Thank you Jennifer! Continue reading “New Year, New Attitude: Teaching Students to Practice Gratitude”

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Proposing A Continuum of Legal Education and Collaboration Beyond Three Years

By: Gregory Bordelon, Executive Director of the Louisiana Committee on Bar Admissions

Law school may be three years, but preparing for life as a lawyer takes much longer – an educational journey that spans close to twenty, if we’re speaking only about formal schooling.  The intricate web of life events that influences a person’s decision to become a lawyer cannot be easily distilled through the often intense period of adapting to the first year of law school. It is not a “one size fits all” proposition.  This, in part, is why people react differently to the 1L year, some with intellectual exhilaration, some with confusion, and others with anxiety and doubt. I refer to studying legal education before and after law school as continuum studies – the study of how events before and after law school impact lawyering. Continue reading “Proposing A Continuum of Legal Education and Collaboration Beyond Three Years”

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‘Twas the Night Before Finals

By: Abigail Perdue 

Final exams can be daunting for first-year law students. Many of them have never had their grade in a course rest on a single exam or been forced to recall everything they have learned throughout the semester under tight time constraints. Although exam anxiety is natural, it can undermine performance. Thus, to interject some light and levity into the stressful exam period, I send my students the following poetic parody of Clement C. Moore’s A Visit from St. Nicholas: Continue reading “‘Twas the Night Before Finals”

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Journaling Your Way to a Job

By: Dana Graber, Regulatory Counsel, Food Marketing Institute[1]

Attorneys are trained to document nearly everything we do.  In law school, every argument is backed by citation to corroborating case law. Likewise, in the real world, law firms spend thousands of dollars each year for document storage. But are law schools missing the mark when it comes to teaching attorneys-in-progress to consistently document their own skills and accomplishments?  I think the answer is yes, which may ultimately do students a disservice during post-graduate job searches. Continue reading “Journaling Your Way to a Job”

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