Candy Bowl: A Sweet Way to Teach Persuasive Writing

By: Professor Abigail Perdue, Wake Forest University School of Law (with attribution to Professors Heather Gram and Catherine Wasson)

Last summer, I attended the LWI Biennial Conference in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. During the first day of the conference, I participated in a teaching workshop where Legal Writing professors were asked to share one of their most creative teaching ideas. My gifted friend and colleague, Heather Gram, of Elon University shared a delightful way to use candy to teach persuasive advocacy.[1]

Fast forward to this February when students seemed more focused on the upcoming Super Bowl than learning how to smoothly transition from objective to persuasive writing. Suddenly, memories of Professor Gram’s sweet idea inspired me to hold my first ever CANDY BOWL! This collaborative, timed exercise is a creative way for students to put ethos, logos, and pathos into practice. And you can enjoy it even if you weren’t rooting for the Patriots! Continue reading “Candy Bowl: A Sweet Way to Teach Persuasive Writing”

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Teaching Technophiles to Collaborate

By: Professor Abigail L. Perdue

Millennials are so named because they were the first generation to come of age in the new millennium. According to a 2010 Pew Center survey, technology use is the number one factor that makes Millennials unique. In Teaching and Reaching Millennials: Fresh Perspectives from an Insider, I explored specific ways to adapt law school pedagogy to the characteristics most commonly attributed to Millennials so as to better prepare these “digital natives” to exceed the expectations of their (mostly) non-Millennial supervisors.[1] Similarly, in Gen Z Goes to Law School: Teaching and Reaching Students in the Post-Millennial Generation, my esteemed colleague, Professor Laura Graham, notes that Gen Zers, who were born between 1995 and 2010, are likewise “saturated with technology.” Yet unlike Millennials, Gen Zers generally dislike collaborative work. This interesting research on generational theory spurred me to develop an exercise that would teach my technophile students how to use technology to meaningfully collaborate. Continue reading “Teaching Technophiles to Collaborate”

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Fostering a Positive Learning Environment: A Law Student’s Perspective

By: Rachel Pender (WFU Law ’20)

The first year of law school can be challenging. In my experience, most law students were the best and brightest at their undergrad and now have to compete against other, equally qualified candidates. Most 1Ls do not have any legal experience and are easily intimidated by professors who are titans in their fields. Despite these hurdles, my first-year professors have established warm and inviting classroom environments that put students at ease while still challenging us to improve. As a teacher turned law student, I wanted to share the following strategies that may help create a more positive learning environment in your classroom: Continue reading “Fostering a Positive Learning Environment: A Law Student’s Perspective”

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