Using a Mock Accessibility Audit to Bring Disability Law to Life

By: Professor Abigail Perdue 

According to the Pew Center, roughly 40 million Americans self-identified as a person with a disability in 2015.[1] Of those, over 20 million adults reported having “serious difficulty walking or climbing stairs.”[2]  Approximately 11 million reported serious hearing impairments, while 7 million reported significant visual impairments.[3]

Yet despite the vast number of persons with disabilities, surprisingly few law students have heard about the Americans with Disabilities Act Accessibility Guidelines (“Guidelines”). The Guidelines include specific scoping and technical requirements, which strive to ensure that persons with disabilities can enjoy equal access to public facilities. They address everything from ATMS and alarms to ramps and toilet stalls. Other sections relate to restaurants and cafeterias, medical care facilities, libraries, courts, correctional facilities, etc. Continue reading “Using a Mock Accessibility Audit to Bring Disability Law to Life”

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Jury Duty Serves Double Duty: How an Experiential Jury Simulation Reinforces Classroom Content and Teaches Practical Skills

By: Rachel Pender (Wake Forest Law ’20)

For many law students, Criminal Law can be a difficult first-year course.  It is less like a Law and Order episode and more like a philosophy class focused on abstract ideas like the purpose of punishment and the meaning of intent. Criminal Law professors can use experiential learning to help students connect these abstract ideas to tangible cases. One excellent example is a jury simulation that several Criminal Law professors at Wake Forest jointly developed to use with their sections. While this activity involved a criminal case, many of the practical lessons learned apply with equal force to all jury trials, whether criminal or civil, and similar experiential learning exercises can be used in other courses. Continue reading “Jury Duty Serves Double Duty: How an Experiential Jury Simulation Reinforces Classroom Content and Teaches Practical Skills”

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Helping Law Students Learn How to Make Mistakes

By: Professor Meghan Boone

“More people would learn from their mistakes if they weren’t so busy denying them.”
– Harold J. Smith

I know what you are thinking – this post must be incorrectly titled. Surely, the author means to discuss how to help law students avoid making mistakes, right? Wrong. I am talking about the fine art of making mistakes, which I argue is critical for the long term professional success of our students. Continue reading “Helping Law Students Learn How to Make Mistakes”

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Tell Your FAIL Stories

By: Professor Danielle Tully

Not surprisingly, we are often wrong.  Sometimes we make simple, embarrassing errors, like hitting reply-all when we shouldn’t (most of us can tell that story).  More often, even for seasoned attorneys, our most troubling errors occur when we are exercising judgment, when we feel like we made the right (or best) call.

Exercising judgment can be fraught with ambiguity especially for law students who feel the profound seduction for certainty, for being right.  Yet, developing competence in exercising judgment is an iterative process.  By this I mean a lengthy process of mastery that involves working through one challenge after another, reflecting on mistakes, evaluating roadblocks, making new plans, and executing strategies.  To get students on board for the ride, students need to embrace errors and learn from them.  But how do we teach that?  And why is it so hard?
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Take Your Students on a Curiosity Voyage this Halloween

The voyage begins with my spooktacular Halloween-themed door.

By: Professor Abigail Perdue

There are stranger things than using a Halloween-themed exercise to engage your students, particularly during this stressful point in the semester. After a weekend of binge-watching Season Two of the Netflix phenomenon, Stranger Things, I reconfigured my Halloween lesson to include items that every respectable professor needs to tame little monsters, brain-drained zombies, and every other ghoul in school:

  • Build suspense with an email inspired by Stranger Things or another Halloween favorite: I sent the following email to my students the day before our Halloween class:

Tomorrow we’re taking a “Curiosity Voyage.” Don’t forget to bring your oars — hard copies of your two cases. However, as you read them, especially the dissenting opinion in the appellate case, don’t get turned Upside Down by the various arguments regarding how to use statistical evidence in a disparate impact case. The way that statistics would be used is not particularly relevant to the Salon at this point (although the case mentions three primary approaches to using statistics, not Eight or Eleven.) It would be highly relevant if the Salon were already facing litigation, but here, we are in a counseling posture. (Trust me on this; friends don’t lie.) Use your unique mental powers to focus primarily on each case’s implications, if any, for Memo Three. There’s nothing stranger than me asking you to bring your laptops to class tomorrow, but please do.[1] Bring your Bluebook, too. You’ll be doing an “eerie exercise” in honor of Halloween and one with a party. (Let’s hope it includes a zoomer and mage lest your mind get flayed!)

Frightfully yours,

Professor Perdue

Continue reading “Take Your Students on a Curiosity Voyage this Halloween”

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