Judging the Benefits of Experiential Learning

By: Samuel Gilleran, J.D. ’20

This summer, I had the fantastic opportunity to participate in Wake Forest’s D.C. Summer Judicial Externship Program (the “Program”). Founded and directed by Professor Abigail Perdue, the Program places select 1Ls and 2Ls into unpaid externships with judges, special masters, and other federal adjudicators in Washington. The Program, which includes an evening course on judicial clerking, is a wonderful experience for many reasons, but I want to focus on one in particular: the significant difference between the externship experience and the traditional 1L curriculum. Continue reading “Judging the Benefits of Experiential Learning”

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Helping Law Students Learn How to Make Mistakes

By: Professor Meghan Boone

“More people would learn from their mistakes if they weren’t so busy denying them.”
– Harold J. Smith

I know what you are thinking – this post must be incorrectly titled. Surely, the author means to discuss how to help law students avoid making mistakes, right? Wrong. I am talking about the fine art of making mistakes, which I argue is critical for the long term professional success of our students. Continue reading “Helping Law Students Learn How to Make Mistakes”

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Journaling Your Way to a Job

By: Dana Graber, Regulatory Counsel, Food Marketing Institute[1]

Attorneys are trained to document nearly everything we do.  In law school, every argument is backed by citation to corroborating case law. Likewise, in the real world, law firms spend thousands of dollars each year for document storage. But are law schools missing the mark when it comes to teaching attorneys-in-progress to consistently document their own skills and accomplishments?  I think the answer is yes, which may ultimately do students a disservice during post-graduate job searches. Continue reading “Journaling Your Way to a Job”

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