All Treats, No Tricks: Law Teaching Ideas for this Halloween

By: Prof. Abigail Perdue

Halloween jack-o-lantern

I LOVE Halloween. Every evening in October, I watch and rewatch Halloween cult classics like Ghostbusters and Hotel Transylvania. I create an eerie graveyard in my front lawn that features a skeleton bursting through the ground and shattering his tombstone into pieces. Pumpkins and gourds of various shapes and sizes line the steps to my home where a giant, black spider waits ready to pounce on unsuspecting trick-or-treaters. So, of course, I also relish any opportunity to “spookify” my law school classes. Here are three fun ways: Continue reading “All Treats, No Tricks: Law Teaching Ideas for this Halloween”

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Take Your Students on a Curiosity Voyage this Halloween

The voyage begins with my spooktacular Halloween-themed door.

By: Professor Abigail Perdue

There are stranger things than using a Halloween-themed exercise to engage your students, particularly during this stressful point in the semester. After a weekend of binge-watching Season Two of the Netflix phenomenon, Stranger Things, I reconfigured my Halloween lesson to include items that every respectable professor needs to tame little monsters, brain-drained zombies, and every other ghoul in school:

  • Build suspense with an email inspired by Stranger Things or another Halloween favorite: I sent the following email to my students the day before our Halloween class:

Tomorrow we’re taking a “Curiosity Voyage.” Don’t forget to bring your oars — hard copies of your two cases. However, as you read them, especially the dissenting opinion in the appellate case, don’t get turned Upside Down by the various arguments regarding how to use statistical evidence in a disparate impact case. The way that statistics would be used is not particularly relevant to the Salon at this point (although the case mentions three primary approaches to using statistics, not Eight or Eleven.) It would be highly relevant if the Salon were already facing litigation, but here, we are in a counseling posture. (Trust me on this; friends don’t lie.) Use your unique mental powers to focus primarily on each case’s implications, if any, for Memo Three. There’s nothing stranger than me asking you to bring your laptops to class tomorrow, but please do.[1] Bring your Bluebook, too. You’ll be doing an “eerie exercise” in honor of Halloween and one with a party. (Let’s hope it includes a zoomer and mage lest your mind get flayed!)

Frightfully yours,

Professor Perdue

Continue reading “Take Your Students on a Curiosity Voyage this Halloween”

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