Wanted: Law Students Who Can Write

By: Professor Abigail Perdue

It’s that time again – the part of the semester when nervous students anxiously buzz around the hallways decked out in black, pinstripe suits and power ties. They carry fancy leather-bound portfolios and practice “firm handshakes” to make a good first impression during on-campus interviews. But too often when I speak to potential employers, I hear the same refrain: Law schools need to do a better job of teaching strong writing and editing skills.

I agree. Legal writing, analysis, editing, and research are fundamental skills at the heart of effective lawyering. No person can be a competent attorney without them. And even when we do our best to prepare students for the practice, we should always strive to do better. But as budgets tighten and the number of core faculty shrink at law schools across America, law professors in general, and legal writing professors in particular, often find themselves between a rock and a hard place expected to do much more for students with far fewer resources at their disposal.

This begs the question: What can legal employers do to identify and attract the best writers? Perhaps they should change the way that they hire. Continue reading “Wanted: Law Students Who Can Write”

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